UOFCA News

UOFCA News (6)

Thursday, 05 July 2018 09:08

Upper Ouse Polution Incident

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Please see the following press release from the Agency following the nasty polution incident on the upper Ouse near Brackley.

From: Area Manager Correspondence, East Anglia [mailto:AreaManagerCorrespondence.EastAnglia@environment-agency.gov.uk]
Sent: 05 July 2018 10:01
Cc: Jerrom, Kye <kye.jerrom@environment-agency.gov.uk>
Subject: River Great Ouse Pollution Incident

Dear all, 

We wanted to provide an update on our response to the pollution incident on the River Great Ouse between Brackley and Milton Keynes.

What we are doing

10 Environment and Fisheries Officers have been out everyday recording evidence and collecting water samples to understand the environmental impact since Friday 29 June. Our incident room opened on Friday to oversee this activity which will continue for the foreseeable future.

Fisheries Officers were looking for evidence of fish mortality, impact on fish stocks and other evidence of environmental impact this will inform any appropriate mitigation and enforcement action.

Current situation

Our current observations suggest that the impact on the environment has reduced and is having less impact further downstream.  We believe that the pollutant has passed through Stony Stratford and into Milton Keynes with no immediate adverse impacts on aquatic life passed Thornton, Buckinghamshire.

It would appear that the pollutant has had a significant impact on aquatic life but we currently don’t believe there is a risk to humans or other animals (pets and livestock), however as a precaution we recommend that people stay out of the River Ouse and keep pets and livestock away from the river between Brackley and Milton Keynes until we have completed our investigation.  We would also advise anglers not to fish in sections of the river if there appears to be pollution eg dead fish or turbid water.

Next steps

Please continue to report anything unusual on the river downstream of Thornton where we have last recorded impacts.  If you become aware of odours, foaming or dead fish please call our Incident Hotline on 0800 80 70 60 – providing location details.

It is too early to tell exactly what damage has been caused but we know many fish have died and there has been an impact on invertebrates as well. We appreciate that people would like us to be able to give concrete time scales regarding the recovery of the river, but in reality it is simply not possible to say exactly how and when the river will recover. A river is a complex ecosystem made up of numerous species of plants, invertebrates and larger species. Different species recover at different rates. Some are likely to return relatively quickly whilst it may take years for other species to be back to recent levels.

We will continue to work after the incident to consider how we might support the river to recover from this pollution event and will be keen to work with anglers, landowners and other interested parties at that time.

Contact us

If you have any questions please can you direct them to our National Customer Contact Centre via enquiries@environment-agency.gov.uk or 03708 506 506 which will ensure your questions are tracked and responded to in a timely manner.

Follow us on Twitter @OusefishEA to stay up to date with Fisheries activity

Finally, we are happy for you to share the information included in this update with others. 

Yours sincerely,

Charles

Dr Charles Beardall 

East Anglia Area Manager

Friday, 17 March 2017 09:16

Ouse Barbel Night

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UOFCA invites you to an Ouse Barbel Night on Wed 29th March, see below for details and presentations as downloadable attachments.

An interesting if albeit very scientific led evening, with over 100 people in attendance.

 

ouse barbel event large

 

Monday, 14 September 2015 07:31

Ouse Restoration Event 12-Sep-15

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A great event was run jointly between UOFCA and the EA on the history and science of what was once one of the greatest Barbel venues in the country, holding various fish of over 20lbadams mill open day

Adams Mill is not what it once was and the EA team presented some interesting material on what has gone wrong and what potentially could restore it to it's former glory.

In the afternoon attendees got their hands dirty being led on implementing some of the practical measures "in the river".

A gallery of pictures from the day taken by Dennis Hunt are below.

The presentations used on the day will also be attached.

I have also added a link to a Youtube video just demostrating the sort of fish that once brought anglers from across the country to this famous venue.

 

Wednesday, 02 September 2015 08:47

Grand Union Roach Restoration Appeal

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Recent years have seen a decline in roach stocks on the Grand Union Canal between Milton Keynes and Braunston. Other canal fish such as gudgeon have also seen a major decline in their population, damaging the native fish biodiversity in the area further. grand union roach appeal

As a result, fewer anglers now visit the fishery and iconic waterway creatures such as otters, kingfishers and herons are also less likely to be spotted as roach are an important food source for them.

We need £5000 to reverse this decline in roach population. £5000 will allow us to increase the spawning success of the roach by introducing specially designed mats on which they can lay their eggs. It will also allow us to use boom boats to remove and relocate the non-native fish species zander to other fisheries, reducing predation pressures on roach stocks. If we don’t take action soon, there is the risk of further spread of zander southwards to the Tring summit and beyond.

If you can, please help kickstart the roach recovery on the Grand Union Canal by donating today.

UOFCA has already donated £1000 towards this scheme, so please help us by making a donation on the CRT link here.

 

 

Wednesday, 02 January 2013 10:15

Gravel Jetting on the Ivel

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The EA folks from Brampton completed the first gravel jetting operation on the River Ivel at Biggleswade Common (200m downstream of Meccano Bridge) on 18th April. With excellent results. There were large quantities of sand and fine stones in the riffle but the gravels underneath were very good, mainly 10 to 30mm stone and a least 150mm deep.

ivel jetting 2012This work follows on from the project investigating Barbel tracking and spawning success on the upper Ouse.

Some excellent material has come to light on the UOFCA & EA sponsored Barbel Phd project.

15,000 small barbel from Calverton fish farm have been introduced into the Ouse above St Ives over 3 years – 70% of them in the past 12 months, whilst a continued program of spawning improvement work between clubs and the EA continues. Work also continues on the creation of refuge areas and restoration of backwaters.

Sunday, 21 June 2015 14:49

Adams Mill Improvements

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adams mill 1EA fisheries officers have restored a spawning bed on Adams Mill, and reinforced a 40 yard section of bank to stop it collapsing in on another section of gravels. They put in a tree trunk as a ‘deflector’ really kicking up turbulence to oxygenate the gravel bed immediately below.

EA staff were assisted by members from MKAA in what was seen a great partnership project on the Upper Ouse.